Tag Archives: radio

Go Pro Note #11 – Soft Skills (You Need ’em)

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By Tish Hevel
School Director & Regional Ops. Mgr.
Ohio Center for Broadcasting
Columbus & Cincinnati Campus
National Marketing Team Leader

I hate buzzwords.  I even hate the word buzzwords.  Anything that sounds like something that’s been said too much is what I’m talking about.  You don’t need me to make a list, you know ’em too.  They’re the things you hear that make you wanna put your thumb and your other fingers together, then open and close em like a beak.  Blah  blah  blah.

But there’s one phrase that’s sticking in my head these days because it’s important.  Soft skills.  I think it means the talents that aren’t directly related to a particular industry.but make you a good person, or employee, or performer.  A work ethic.  A willingness to jump in and help.  A demeanor that says I’m all in.  Dependability.  Punctuality.  Professionalism. 

Those are the things that are even more important than talent.  Trust me on this, I’m old and I know things.  One of my responsibilities in my first television job was to get dinner for the anchors.  Did I love that part of the job?  ‘Course not.  Couldn’t stand it.  But no one knew.  And to show I understood the importance of TV deadlines, I was always early.  Wanted to be thought of as willing and dependable, and the only way I knew how to make that happen was to actually BE those things.

Soft skills.  They may be the hardest habits to develop.

Tish Hevel (with her friend, anchorwoman Norma Rashid) doesn’t look like this anymore.  But when she sported big hair and shoulder pads back in the 80’s, she ran television newsrooms. And worked on her soft skills.  Still does.

Ohio Center for Broadcasting
http://www.beonair.com

Tish

Go Pro Note #9 – BEWARE: They May Be Listening

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By Atom Smasher
Host of The Atom Smasher Morning Show
Hot 96 FM  Evansville, IN
http://www.hot96.com

NOTE FROM GO PRO:  In the following blog we hear/read a couple of stories from Atom.  Take them, remember them, and perceive the lesson as you will.  Everyone builds their own philosophy, you may not want to “beware” of the celebs listening, that’s your thing.  Secondly, the above picture is the most ridiculous thing we’ve ever seen and we promise that it kind of ties into the blog post.  Maybe.

You might be surprised. It was 2000 I believe and I was in Houston doing a night show. P. Diddy then known as Puff Daddy was doing a show in town and I decided to do a bit making fun of the “gun charge” he was rumored to be facing. He got caught up in some night club shooting if you remember. Anyways, I had a fake traffic reporter in a fake helicopter (which was just me with a helicopter sound effect) called Sgt. Smasher. He was a real a**hole and terrible traffic reporter. He would never actually report on traffic but he would check in to tell us about the fat unattractive girl on the corner of 1st and MLK that he suspected was a hooker. Well, he (uh…I) decided to make up a fake police shootout with a limo involving Diddy and his entourage. He used stuff like “Gats blazing” and “Bustin a whole lotta caps in a whole lotta asses”. Can’t remember word for word but you get the point. What I didn’t know or even consider was that Puffy (Diddy or whatever) was listening at that time. Who would’ve figured? My program director was called and told Diddy was not pleased. I was asked to stop talking about it and the show went on. Some celebrity’s can’t take a joke.

A lot like the Backstreet Boys. I made a prank call to a rehab center asking for A.J. (when he was doing that rehab stunt). I can’t remember exactly what I said although I’m sure it was asinine. The Backstreet Boys were also in town and heard the bit. I was scheduled to be at the concert the following day but something came up and I had to leave town for a family emergency. The guy who went in my place said he was approached by Brian and a couple of big security guards asking if he was Atom Smasher. He said they weren’t happy. Screw um’……their music sucks anyway.

Atom Smasher is the host of the Atom Smasher Morning Show on Hot 96 in Evansville, IN.  He has more tattoos than you do.  He also has a giant Tiger tattoo on his neck.  Intro to Go Pro in no way endorses his views on the Backstreet Boy’s music.  We’ve been guilty of a Backstreet singalong or two. Listen to the Atom Smasher show live by going to http://www.hot96.com


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Ohio Center for Broadcasting
http://www.beonair.com

Go Pro Note #3 – Passion for the Industry

By Bruce Ryan
Director of Education
Ohio Center for Broadcasting

In the broadcast media industry, one of the common denominators for success in delivering any message is “Passion”

One of the definitions of “passion” in Webster’s dictionary is “a powerful feeling”.

Isn’t a “powerful feeling” a prerequisite for conveying a message that is believable and remembered by your audience and clients?

No matter who your message is targeted too, and no matter what the message is, if there is no passion behind the message, then chances are the message gets lost along with about 5,000 others that the average American is exposed too each day.

If you track any successful broadcaster, whether they be on-air, behind the scenes (director, producer, shooter, editor, etc), you will find that one of the keys to their success is that the content they create is driven by a passionate delivery of that content to their audience. After all, our whole purpose is to take our very heart, soul and minds and connect them to the hearts, souls and minds of the audience to ultimately evoke an emotion from them.

The same holds true for a great song or movie.  There is sincere passion in the message.

If you as an on-air personality are out at an event where you are working a live audience, you better be sincerely passionate about your live audience, which requires you to be interactive with them in a sincere and fun way.

In today’s media environment, with so many choices on the part of the consumer, as to what to watch and or listen too, it is imperative that you as a current or future broadcaster be passionate about your audience and the message that you are conveying to them.

Be sincere in the content you create and  convey to your audience, making sure that the content is relevant, and drive the message home with “feeling” that is powerful in its delivery. 

This broadcast media business is not about you and me, but rather it is totally about the audience who partakes of our media, and the only way to keep that audience coming back for more is to be genuinely passionate in your sharing of information and ideas with them. You’ve got to “feel” what you do!!

 Bruce is currently the National Director of Education at the Ohio Center for Broadcasting.  He is known for some wildly wonderful fist pounding speeches. 

http://www.beonair.com

Bruce

Go Pro Note #1 – The Listener

By Patrick Locy
CD 101 FM
Columbus, OH

The terrestrial radio business seems to shift focus on a regular basis – one moment the focus is on squeezing money from the airwaves, weeks later it’s the importance of effective programming, and two months beyond that it’s the incorporation of continually advancing technology… but the core focus of terrestrial radio will always remain the same: the listener. Some days the listener is your best friend, your biggest critic, and an unintentional source of comedy – all at once.

If we subtract the audience from my radio broadcast, I’m just someone listening to my favorite records and talking to myself. Add a few hundred listeners, and all the sudden the broadcast has a greater purpose. And when eventually the hundreds become thousands, as a radio broadcaster you’re put in an interesting very position; how do you incorporate the advice of the listener into the content you provide – your broadcast? If you do, how much is too much?

Had I followed the suggestions of a handful of listeners I would have played Bob Dylan, and only Bob Dylan, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. I would have given up on the “passing phase” that is rock-and-roll radio, and maybe even trashed my microphone and gone home… you see where this is heading. On the other hand, I’ve also had listeners offer up information that’s improved a show, offer up great suggestions, and provide an endless source of topics to address.

In the end, as you advance in your broadcasting career you’ll develop a working understanding of what to take to heart, what you can quickly dismiss with a laugh, and that rare occasion when you just need to turn those tapes over the local authorities… Remember that the listener is not simply your immediate feedback, or the person that ultimately signs your paycheck -the listener is the reason you chose to become a broadcaster. Find an audience you can’t wait to interact with on a regular basis, and when you begin to develop the broadcaster – audience relationship, consider yourself well on your way to success.

Patrick Locy is also the Assistant Education Director at the Ohio Center for Broadcasting Columbus campus and a regular contributor to the Intro to Go Pro Blog.

http://www.beonair.com

Patrick