Tag Archives: ocb

Go Pro Note #8 – Become “One of Them”

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By Dave Huffman
Outside Marketing Coordinator
Ohio Center for Broadcasting

First off, the above picture has really nothing to do with the blog.  Unless you’re into the deeper meanings of things.  I just like mullet haircuts.

In this new age of striving for financial freedom, my wife and I decided it was time to shed the nice cars, or ehem, ONE nice car and go get a “junker.”

One of the junkers we picked out was a 2004 Hyundai Santa Fe with just under 100,000 miles.  We found it online, so I clicked the “make an offer” button and made the first offer.

Here is the response I got from the salesman:

Thank you for the e-mail, I am your Sales Consultant. This is a very nice Hyundia Santa Fe GL, when can we make an appointment for you to see, drive and buy this almost new Hyundia?

Almost NEW?  Nope.  Sorry, not even close.

Now I have my guard up and I’m almost certain I’m not buying the car from this place.

What does this have to do with my career or broadcasting? Hold your horses, I’m getting there.

If he would’ve been REAL with me and not tried to pull the wool over my eyes by acting like the car is almost new, I would’ve felt like he was “One of Us”, to steal a term from Chris Brogan.  I would’ve immediately believed in him and certainly would’ve had a better feeling about purchasing from him.  I wouldn’t have felt like he was changing into his Sales Pants to “sell” me a car.

Now, I’m not in broadcasting, so you’ll have to take this and apply it to how you think it would fit into the betterment of your career.  However, coming from the Music Industry, I can make a few educated guesses as to how you can Become One of Them.

  • Interact with listeners at appearances. Don’t sit behind the table with your arms crossed because you are “The Talent.”  Get out and play games with people, ask them about their lives.   They are interested enough in you to tune in everyday…so why would you put a wall up and not try to get to know them?
  • Write a blog. Yea, I’m saying it again.  Go start a blog right now.  You don’t need to be a great writer to blog.  Yes it’s true that bloggers are becoming more and more proficient writers, but some of the best were viewed as such because they told a story and the blog was easy to read.
  • Choose Your ‘Tude. Get rid of the attitude, you’re not better than anyone else.  Dr. Smith of CD101 has a great Go Pro Minute Video about having the right attitude.  It’s really not cliche.  In fact, it should be #1 on EVERY hiring list.  Given the choice between someone that really knows their sh*t and is even barely an a-hole and someone that doesn’t know anything but is willing to do and learn anything.  I’ll kick the a-hole to the curb everytime.
  • Comment Back. Has a listener commented on your Facebook or Myspace page?  Have they?  Ok, then why in the holy crap didn’t you comment back?  If you were in a conversation with someone and they asked you a question, would you stare them in the eyes and not answer?  Of course not, you’d probably be carted away to the hospital if so.  Social Media isn’t any different.  It’s still a tool of communication.

We could go on for days.  These are just a few items I think are important.  You could actually strike all of them and/or umbrella them under “Attitude.”

Choose your ‘Tude, dude.

Dave Huffman is the Outside Marketing Coordinator for the Ohio Center for Broadcasting.  He is currently working on crafting a bigger Baby Bjorn since his son no longer fits into the one in the picture below.

http://www.beonair.com

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Go Pro Minute #3 – Difficult Situations

Go Pro Note #4 – Editing is like baking (kind of)

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 By Amanda O’Casek
 Producer, TBNK
 Northern Kentucky

 For me editing can be a simple process if done correctly with beautiful results.  I am a producer for TBNK (Telecommunications Board of Northern Kentucky).  I work on a show called “Discover Northern Kentucky” which is historical documentary type.  I look at it like building a two layer cake.

First you start with a good base, your first cake layer.  I usually start with my interviews.  I edit them to create the base of my show and work around that.  Then the first layer of icing, b-roll.  No one wants to watch 30 minutes of someone else talking so you layer the interviews with b-roll to match what the person is talking about.  Now the second layer of cake, the bridges.  Bridges are basically my voice-overs to connect the different pieces of the interviews.  This can be from one interview or multiple ones depending on the subject.  The top layer of icing is the rest of the b-roll over the bridges.

Now that you have the basic “cake” time to decorate.  First I add in the transitions between footage.  Remember to NOT go overboard or it becomes too much for a person to watch.  A simple decoration on a cake creates the best effect much like effects of editing.  Keep it simple.  Finally, add the lower thirds, bugs, and audio adjustments.  Make sure you have your intro and outro and in the words of Emeril BAM!, you have a beautiful two-layer “cake”.

Amanda O’Casek is a Producer at TBNK in Northern Kentucky.  Have editing questions?  Reach out to her at ocasek.a@beonair.com

Ohio Center for Broadcasting
http://www.beonair.com

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Go Pro Note #3 – Passion for the Industry

By Bruce Ryan
Director of Education
Ohio Center for Broadcasting

In the broadcast media industry, one of the common denominators for success in delivering any message is “Passion”

One of the definitions of “passion” in Webster’s dictionary is “a powerful feeling”.

Isn’t a “powerful feeling” a prerequisite for conveying a message that is believable and remembered by your audience and clients?

No matter who your message is targeted too, and no matter what the message is, if there is no passion behind the message, then chances are the message gets lost along with about 5,000 others that the average American is exposed too each day.

If you track any successful broadcaster, whether they be on-air, behind the scenes (director, producer, shooter, editor, etc), you will find that one of the keys to their success is that the content they create is driven by a passionate delivery of that content to their audience. After all, our whole purpose is to take our very heart, soul and minds and connect them to the hearts, souls and minds of the audience to ultimately evoke an emotion from them.

The same holds true for a great song or movie.  There is sincere passion in the message.

If you as an on-air personality are out at an event where you are working a live audience, you better be sincerely passionate about your live audience, which requires you to be interactive with them in a sincere and fun way.

In today’s media environment, with so many choices on the part of the consumer, as to what to watch and or listen too, it is imperative that you as a current or future broadcaster be passionate about your audience and the message that you are conveying to them.

Be sincere in the content you create and  convey to your audience, making sure that the content is relevant, and drive the message home with “feeling” that is powerful in its delivery. 

This broadcast media business is not about you and me, but rather it is totally about the audience who partakes of our media, and the only way to keep that audience coming back for more is to be genuinely passionate in your sharing of information and ideas with them. You’ve got to “feel” what you do!!

 Bruce is currently the National Director of Education at the Ohio Center for Broadcasting.  He is known for some wildly wonderful fist pounding speeches. 

http://www.beonair.com

Bruce

Go Pro Notes #2 – Contentcasting (Part 1)

Contentcasting.

 I thought I made the word up and literally for about 30 minutes I strutted around the house, chest puffed out, like I was some kind of mad genius.  Then I did a Google search and it killed my ego.  At least 10 pages of links popped up on the subject.

Anyways…

This is where we are now in Broadcasting.  It’s now about content generation.  And I’m not just talking about posting pictures and videos to the web to try and steal a plot of web space.  I’m referring to meaningful, remarkable, entertaining content that the listener can take and share and use to spread your message for you.

People are online more than ever now.  Even McDonald’s has wireless internet access.  And forget the giant suitcase like bag cell phones from 1994, even today’s lowest level cell phone gets the internet.  And people want information.  Constantly.

Books have been written on this subject, so without getting too deep into the why and the how, let’s keep it short and just focus on the importance of building this into your skillset.  We can go into further detail in later posts. 

Basically, you need to build a Content Culture into your show.  Whatever that show is:  Radio, TV, mornings, afternoons, evenings.  Train yourself to view everything as possible content for your show.  Blog topics, Vlogs (video blogs), pictures, videos, and audio.  The list goes on and on.  The more creative and different you are with the content, the bigger the payoff. 

My wife does a morning show here in Evansville, IN and she doesn’t go anywhere without her FlipVideo camera, digital camera for photos, and a digital voice recorder.  AT ANY GIVEN TIME she can whip one of those weapons out like Doc Holiday in Tombstone.  Or wait, maybe John Wayne.  I don’t know who has the faster draw.  Either way, she’s fast and good and the result is a ton of content to sift through for her show. The stuff that makes it through “the sift” gets posted to their website and social networking sites.  Giving listeners a reason to not only stick around their sites longer, but keep them coming back again and again.

We could now take a left turn and start talking about website impressions leading to an increase in revenue and blah, blah, blah.  You get the point.

Some of this is often referred to as New Media.  I hesitate to use that term because it isn’t NEW anymore.  If you aren’t doing it, you’re irrelevant.  Bottom line.

Step one:  Go start a blog right now.  And sign up to recieve the Copyblogger Blog.  It’ll help you with your writing.

David Huffman is the Outside Marketing Coordinator for the Ohio Center for Broadcasting.  He currently chases his wife around the country as she maintains a Morning Radio career.  They currently reside in Evansville, IN.

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http://www.beonair.com

Go Pro Note #1 – The Listener

By Patrick Locy
CD 101 FM
Columbus, OH

The terrestrial radio business seems to shift focus on a regular basis – one moment the focus is on squeezing money from the airwaves, weeks later it’s the importance of effective programming, and two months beyond that it’s the incorporation of continually advancing technology… but the core focus of terrestrial radio will always remain the same: the listener. Some days the listener is your best friend, your biggest critic, and an unintentional source of comedy – all at once.

If we subtract the audience from my radio broadcast, I’m just someone listening to my favorite records and talking to myself. Add a few hundred listeners, and all the sudden the broadcast has a greater purpose. And when eventually the hundreds become thousands, as a radio broadcaster you’re put in an interesting very position; how do you incorporate the advice of the listener into the content you provide – your broadcast? If you do, how much is too much?

Had I followed the suggestions of a handful of listeners I would have played Bob Dylan, and only Bob Dylan, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. I would have given up on the “passing phase” that is rock-and-roll radio, and maybe even trashed my microphone and gone home… you see where this is heading. On the other hand, I’ve also had listeners offer up information that’s improved a show, offer up great suggestions, and provide an endless source of topics to address.

In the end, as you advance in your broadcasting career you’ll develop a working understanding of what to take to heart, what you can quickly dismiss with a laugh, and that rare occasion when you just need to turn those tapes over the local authorities… Remember that the listener is not simply your immediate feedback, or the person that ultimately signs your paycheck -the listener is the reason you chose to become a broadcaster. Find an audience you can’t wait to interact with on a regular basis, and when you begin to develop the broadcaster – audience relationship, consider yourself well on your way to success.

Patrick Locy is also the Assistant Education Director at the Ohio Center for Broadcasting Columbus campus and a regular contributor to the Intro to Go Pro Blog.

http://www.beonair.com

Patrick