Tag Archives: advice

Go Pro Note #11 – Soft Skills (You Need ’em)

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By Tish Hevel
School Director & Regional Ops. Mgr.
Ohio Center for Broadcasting
Columbus & Cincinnati Campus
National Marketing Team Leader

I hate buzzwords.  I even hate the word buzzwords.  Anything that sounds like something that’s been said too much is what I’m talking about.  You don’t need me to make a list, you know ’em too.  They’re the things you hear that make you wanna put your thumb and your other fingers together, then open and close em like a beak.  Blah  blah  blah.

But there’s one phrase that’s sticking in my head these days because it’s important.  Soft skills.  I think it means the talents that aren’t directly related to a particular industry.but make you a good person, or employee, or performer.  A work ethic.  A willingness to jump in and help.  A demeanor that says I’m all in.  Dependability.  Punctuality.  Professionalism. 

Those are the things that are even more important than talent.  Trust me on this, I’m old and I know things.  One of my responsibilities in my first television job was to get dinner for the anchors.  Did I love that part of the job?  ‘Course not.  Couldn’t stand it.  But no one knew.  And to show I understood the importance of TV deadlines, I was always early.  Wanted to be thought of as willing and dependable, and the only way I knew how to make that happen was to actually BE those things.

Soft skills.  They may be the hardest habits to develop.

Tish Hevel (with her friend, anchorwoman Norma Rashid) doesn’t look like this anymore.  But when she sported big hair and shoulder pads back in the 80’s, she ran television newsrooms. And worked on her soft skills.  Still does.

Ohio Center for Broadcasting
http://www.beonair.com

Tish

Go Pro Note #7 – Beyond Ron Burgundy

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By Johnny DiLoretto
Fox 28’s Good Day Columbus
Genius/Keepin’ It Real Afficianado

 

Keeping it real… Being you… Staying true to yourself… Whatever you want to call it, you’ll never reach your full potential as an on-air talent without coming to some kind of comfortable agreement with the microphone or camera. So how to be yourself and deliver the broadcasting goods? Well, first, try some practice runs where you deliver some hard news as though you were telling it to a friend. Something like “hey, did you see that big-ass fire last night? Whoof, damn thing blazin’ — nearly burnt up every house on the block. Guess it started because some fool fell asleep chompin’ on a cigar while he was reading Moby Dick. The book went up and shooof – there you have it. Big book, big fire.”

 Ok, maybe that’s a little too casual… but what do you want? This is my first blog entry. Seriously though, the above paragraph is not a bad place to start. Just keep reeling it in until you’re still being you and still getting the info through. And remember — the audience respects an on-air person who isn’t faking it. They’ll accept you, the camera and the microphone will accept you, if you behave more like a real person and less like a robotic impersonation of some stiff, generic anchor person.

Johnny DiLoretto is an anchor for Fox 28’s Good Day Columbus in Columbus, OH.  He is a genius and a scholar, and a genius (one more for good measure), and he loves Scotch, scotch, scotch.  Ok, we made that up. 

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Ohio Center for Broadcasting
http://www.beonair.com

Go Pro Note #3 – Passion for the Industry

By Bruce Ryan
Director of Education
Ohio Center for Broadcasting

In the broadcast media industry, one of the common denominators for success in delivering any message is “Passion”

One of the definitions of “passion” in Webster’s dictionary is “a powerful feeling”.

Isn’t a “powerful feeling” a prerequisite for conveying a message that is believable and remembered by your audience and clients?

No matter who your message is targeted too, and no matter what the message is, if there is no passion behind the message, then chances are the message gets lost along with about 5,000 others that the average American is exposed too each day.

If you track any successful broadcaster, whether they be on-air, behind the scenes (director, producer, shooter, editor, etc), you will find that one of the keys to their success is that the content they create is driven by a passionate delivery of that content to their audience. After all, our whole purpose is to take our very heart, soul and minds and connect them to the hearts, souls and minds of the audience to ultimately evoke an emotion from them.

The same holds true for a great song or movie.  There is sincere passion in the message.

If you as an on-air personality are out at an event where you are working a live audience, you better be sincerely passionate about your live audience, which requires you to be interactive with them in a sincere and fun way.

In today’s media environment, with so many choices on the part of the consumer, as to what to watch and or listen too, it is imperative that you as a current or future broadcaster be passionate about your audience and the message that you are conveying to them.

Be sincere in the content you create and  convey to your audience, making sure that the content is relevant, and drive the message home with “feeling” that is powerful in its delivery. 

This broadcast media business is not about you and me, but rather it is totally about the audience who partakes of our media, and the only way to keep that audience coming back for more is to be genuinely passionate in your sharing of information and ideas with them. You’ve got to “feel” what you do!!

 Bruce is currently the National Director of Education at the Ohio Center for Broadcasting.  He is known for some wildly wonderful fist pounding speeches. 

http://www.beonair.com

Bruce

Go Pro Notes #2 – Contentcasting (Part 1)

Contentcasting.

 I thought I made the word up and literally for about 30 minutes I strutted around the house, chest puffed out, like I was some kind of mad genius.  Then I did a Google search and it killed my ego.  At least 10 pages of links popped up on the subject.

Anyways…

This is where we are now in Broadcasting.  It’s now about content generation.  And I’m not just talking about posting pictures and videos to the web to try and steal a plot of web space.  I’m referring to meaningful, remarkable, entertaining content that the listener can take and share and use to spread your message for you.

People are online more than ever now.  Even McDonald’s has wireless internet access.  And forget the giant suitcase like bag cell phones from 1994, even today’s lowest level cell phone gets the internet.  And people want information.  Constantly.

Books have been written on this subject, so without getting too deep into the why and the how, let’s keep it short and just focus on the importance of building this into your skillset.  We can go into further detail in later posts. 

Basically, you need to build a Content Culture into your show.  Whatever that show is:  Radio, TV, mornings, afternoons, evenings.  Train yourself to view everything as possible content for your show.  Blog topics, Vlogs (video blogs), pictures, videos, and audio.  The list goes on and on.  The more creative and different you are with the content, the bigger the payoff. 

My wife does a morning show here in Evansville, IN and she doesn’t go anywhere without her FlipVideo camera, digital camera for photos, and a digital voice recorder.  AT ANY GIVEN TIME she can whip one of those weapons out like Doc Holiday in Tombstone.  Or wait, maybe John Wayne.  I don’t know who has the faster draw.  Either way, she’s fast and good and the result is a ton of content to sift through for her show. The stuff that makes it through “the sift” gets posted to their website and social networking sites.  Giving listeners a reason to not only stick around their sites longer, but keep them coming back again and again.

We could now take a left turn and start talking about website impressions leading to an increase in revenue and blah, blah, blah.  You get the point.

Some of this is often referred to as New Media.  I hesitate to use that term because it isn’t NEW anymore.  If you aren’t doing it, you’re irrelevant.  Bottom line.

Step one:  Go start a blog right now.  And sign up to recieve the Copyblogger Blog.  It’ll help you with your writing.

David Huffman is the Outside Marketing Coordinator for the Ohio Center for Broadcasting.  He currently chases his wife around the country as she maintains a Morning Radio career.  They currently reside in Evansville, IN.

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http://www.beonair.com

Go Pro Note #1 – The Listener

By Patrick Locy
CD 101 FM
Columbus, OH

The terrestrial radio business seems to shift focus on a regular basis – one moment the focus is on squeezing money from the airwaves, weeks later it’s the importance of effective programming, and two months beyond that it’s the incorporation of continually advancing technology… but the core focus of terrestrial radio will always remain the same: the listener. Some days the listener is your best friend, your biggest critic, and an unintentional source of comedy – all at once.

If we subtract the audience from my radio broadcast, I’m just someone listening to my favorite records and talking to myself. Add a few hundred listeners, and all the sudden the broadcast has a greater purpose. And when eventually the hundreds become thousands, as a radio broadcaster you’re put in an interesting very position; how do you incorporate the advice of the listener into the content you provide – your broadcast? If you do, how much is too much?

Had I followed the suggestions of a handful of listeners I would have played Bob Dylan, and only Bob Dylan, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. I would have given up on the “passing phase” that is rock-and-roll radio, and maybe even trashed my microphone and gone home… you see where this is heading. On the other hand, I’ve also had listeners offer up information that’s improved a show, offer up great suggestions, and provide an endless source of topics to address.

In the end, as you advance in your broadcasting career you’ll develop a working understanding of what to take to heart, what you can quickly dismiss with a laugh, and that rare occasion when you just need to turn those tapes over the local authorities… Remember that the listener is not simply your immediate feedback, or the person that ultimately signs your paycheck -the listener is the reason you chose to become a broadcaster. Find an audience you can’t wait to interact with on a regular basis, and when you begin to develop the broadcaster – audience relationship, consider yourself well on your way to success.

Patrick Locy is also the Assistant Education Director at the Ohio Center for Broadcasting Columbus campus and a regular contributor to the Intro to Go Pro Blog.

http://www.beonair.com

Patrick